Monday, February 4, 2013

Mushi: Electrogravitics a space propulsion possibility

[A] conventional gravitational detector, can be constructed by utilizing the electrogravitic effect of dielectric materials, that was originally found by T.T.Brown for the investigation on rock electricity. He also studied the application of the Biefeld-Brown effect for the space propulsion system and this result suggest the possibility to construct a propulsion system according to the Ivanov’s theory by utilizing dielectric materials.
 From Possibility to construct a gravitational wave detector by utilizing the electrogravitic property of dielectric materials  Takaki Mushi, Journal of Space Exploration, September 2012.

I'd like to know more about Ivanov's theorem, but the sources Mushi cites are all unpublished papers from the Bulgarian nuclear research institute.

  • B.V.Ivanov; Strong gravitational force induced by static electromagnetic fields, xxx.lanl.gov (gr-qc/0407048), Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgaria, unpublished,
    (2004).
  • B.V.Ivanov; On the gravitational field induced by static electromagnetic sources, archive xxx.lanl.gov, xxx.lanl.gov (grqc/0502047), Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear
    Energy, Bulgaria, unpublished, (2005).
  • B.V.Ivanov; Weyl electrovacuum solutions and gauge invariance, xxx.lanl.gov (gr-qc/0507082), Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgaria, unpublished, (2005).

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi, what do think of ST13A-003 in here? http://www.acq.osd.mil/osbp/sbir/solicitations/sttr2013A/darpa13A.htm

ST13A-003 TITLE: Development of Gravitational Radiation Technology for Military Applications

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems

OBJECTIVE: Demonstrate key technologies to enable application of gravitational radiation theory and research to military communications and navigation.

DESCRIPTION: There is a need for world-wide communications and navigation systems which do not need a sky-view link or line-of-sight and which are less vulnerable to threat activity. Satellite communication and navigation systems are vulnerable to interdiction and are expensive to maintain and operate.

One, very high risk approach is the adaptation of gravitational radiation (GR) to communications. GR is unaffected by obstructions such as the mass of the earth and thus offers a promise of world-wide, ground-based communications and navigation systems.



"High frequency gravity wave" seems to be the buzzword here. Is this in Townsend's backyard, or just a new take on the ordinary everyday Einsteinian kind of gravity wave?

A Rose by any other name... said...

First, let me thank you for bringing that forward.

It is interesting that this RFP is being issued under an Information Technology Line Item.

And of course, this grabbed my attention:

"One, very high risk approach is the adaptation of gravitational radiation (GR) to communications." I wonder what risk assessments have been done to date?

""High frequency gravity wave" seems to be the buzzword here. Is this in Townsend's backyard, or just a new take on the ordinary everyday Einsteinian kind of gravity wave?"

I don't know. While we can trace Townsend's footsteps in propulsion development, I believe his work in communications was even more advanced and as such is likely to remain deeply hidden.